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- 2000 SEASON -
PROGRAM 4
PROGRAM 5
PROGRAM 6
PROGRAM 7
- 1999 SEASON -
PROGRAM 1
PROGRAM 2
PROGRAM 3

Explore key events in Maine history.

Explore Maine cultural history.

Explore Maine's Native American heritage.

Lesson plans and ideas for classroom teachers.

Check out other interesting history sites

The first farmers

Agriculture organizes

Agriculture today

Read a printable transcript of this program.

Site index



Featured interviews on "A Love for the Land"

Clyde G. Berry

Clyde G. Berry, Lecturer National Grange

When Clyde G. Berry, fourth generation granger, joined the Glenburn Grange in 1961, he began a life's journey dedicated to Maine agriculture. His service to his local grange was acknowledged statewide in 1982 when he was elected Lecturer of the Maine State Grange. He went on to become Overseer and Master as well as Steward for the National Grange before he was elected a national Lecturer in 1997. He is an active historian serving as President for many organizations including the Maine Genealogical society.

Philip A Herbert

Philip A Herbert, Master Maine State Grange

Philip A. Herbert loves the land. He gardens, hunts, fishes, and just down right enjoys the scenery. His devotion to agriculture springs from this passion. Philip has served the Maine State Grange as Master since 1997 and, before that, as Chief Deputy for eight years. He's been actively involved since 1971when he first joined his hometown grange in Old Town.

Billie Gammon

Billie Gammon, Founder, Norlands Living History Center

Ethel "Billie" Gammon, founder of Norlands Living History Center in Livermore Falls, is one of the nation's most influential figures in the field of "hands on" history. She led the effort to preserve and renovate Norlands, a 450-acre historic estate that belonged to the Washburns. In doing so, Billie made everyday 19th century Maine life come alive for children, families and history students. Billie now holds the position of Supervisor of Post-Secondary Programs at Norlands.

Norma Boothby
Les Boothby


Norma and Les Boothby, Century Elm Farms

The Boothby farm in Livermore has been in the family since 1849. Norma and Les Boothby, fifth generation farmers, began working the farm in 1956. This 1,200-acre parcel is now known as Century Elm Farms, Inc. and produces fresh garden vegetables for the popular Boothby farm stand. Norma and Les say it's now time to turn over the reigns to their son Robert, making him the sixth generation to run the family farm.

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ALSO WITH PROGRAM 4: THE FIRST FARMERS | AGRICULTURE ORGANIZES | AGRICULTURE TODAY | TRANSCRIPT

2000 SEASON: PROGRAM 4 | PROGRAM 5 | PROGRAM 6 | PROGRAM 7
1999 SEASON: PROGRAM 1 | PROGRAM 2 | PROGRAM 3

HISTORY TIMELINE | ARTS & CULTURE TIMELINE | NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURE | CLASSROOM | HISTORY LINKS | SITE INDEX

 

HOME: The Story of Maine on the Maine Public Broadcasting Network was made in partnership with the Maine State Museum. Major funding was provided by the  Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal agency committed to fostering innovation, leadership and a lifetime of learning. Additional funding provided by Elsie Viles.
Major funding for previous seasons of  HOME: The Story of Maine was made possible by a grant from Rural Development, a part of the USDA. Special support is provided by The Maine State Museum and Northeast Historic Films.